Fire-adapted forests; Hazard reduction; Ecosystem restoration; Treatment demonstration; Interdisciplinary research; National replication
Hazard Reduction/Ecosystem Restoration Study: Home
Wildlife

Thinning- and fire-induced changes in forest structure and processes can influence wildlife on several levels. Specifically, hazard reduction treatments potentially influence songbirds and small mammals at the community, the population, and the individual level.

Core Variables

~ Nest success of songbirds:

Ground nesters: dark-eyed junco (Junco hyemalis)
Shrub/tree nesters: chipping sparrow (Spizella passerine)
Cavity nesters: red-breasted nuthatch (Sitta canadensis)
Mountain chickadee (Poecile gambeli)
Woodpeckers (Picoides spp).

~ Composition and abundance of songbird species

~ Foraging patterns of bark gleaning birds (nuthatches and woodpeckers)

~ Composition and abundance of small mammal species

Yellow-pine chipmunk, a common species on research sites
Yellow-pine chipmunk, a common species on research sites.
Ongoing Studies

~ Effects of hazard reduction treatments on songbird nest success

~ Possible shifts in songbird species composition and abundance due to hazard reduction treatments

~ Effects of hazard reduction treatments on foraging patterns of bark gleaning birds

~Woodpecker use of beetle-infested trees

~ Shifts in small mammal species composition and abundance due to hazard reduction treatments

Cooperative Studies

The insects and disease discipline provides data on beetle infestation to identify trees for tracking woodpecker use.

Red-breasted nuthatch nestling
An example of a cavity nest. A red-breasted nuthatch nestling pokes its head out.
Wildlife Factoids

~37 songbird species have been recorded on research sites.

~Common songbird species identified include: dark eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis), chipping sparrows (Spizella passerine), red-breasted nuthatches (Sitta canadensis), mountain chickadees (Poecile gambeli), western tanagers (Piranga ludoviciana), Cassin's vireo (Vireo cassinii), yellow-rumped warblers (Dendroica coronata), and pine siskins (Carduelis pinus).

~9 small mammal species have been recorded on research sites.

~Common small mammal species identified include: deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), yellow pine chipmunks (Tamias amoenus), and red-backed voles (Clethrionomys gapperi).

~If you would like to see some examples of our wildlife, or the wildlife crew in action, check out our wildlife pictures.

Go back to Research Activities or check out what has already been done on our Products page
Lubrecht FFS Home
For information on this study contact Carl Fiedler.

For comments on this website contact Kerry Metlen.