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Honors Option

Student in the fieldThe Honor's Option provides students with basics of biological sciences in the first 2 years and allows students to develop their own curriculum during their junior and senior years to better meet their desired needs. In addition, Honor's Option students can work one-on-one with a faculty member to complete a senior thesis project. The Honor's Option requires 30 credits at UM and a 3.5 GPA.

Application Information

Application information can be found at the Undergraduate Admissions. However, if you have any questions or if we can help you at all, do not hesitate to contact our office for information (406) 243-5292 or by email at wbio@cfc.umt.edu.

Honors Requirements

Special Requirements

Wildlife Biology Honors Emphasis The honors curriculum is designed particularly for students with strong academic records who intend to do graduate work. Entrance into this emphasis is open only to students who, at the beginning of the junior year of the wildlife biology program, have a grade point average of 3.5 or above and who petition the faculty for entrance. Honors students must complete either WILD 370, 470 and 494 (terrestrial option ) or BIOO 340, BIOE 428 and WILD 494 (aquatic option).

Honors students are encouraged to enroll also in WILD 499 Senior Thesis. The balance of the coursework for the junior and senior years will be developed in consultation with the honors student's faculty advisor and committee appointed by the director of the wildlife biology program.

All students in the honors emphasis are required to meet with their faculty advisors prior to autumn semester registration of their junior and senior years to work out their course schedules.

View the Course Catalog

Senior Theses

Jonathan Ebel, Wildlife Biology Program - The effect of road culverts on the movement of Idaho Giant Salamanders (Dicamptodon aterrimus) in the Lochsa basin, Idaho.

Laurel Ann Curry, Wildlife Biology Program - The effect of climate variation on growth rates and body condition of Columbia spotted frogs (Rana luteiventris) in a high mountain ecosystem

Scott Eggeman, Wildlife Biology Program - Fluctuating asymmetry in elk antlers is unrelated to environmental conditions in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

Michel Kohl, Wildlife Biology Program - Relationships Between Elk and Spotted Knapweek in the Wildland Urban Interface of Western Montana

Brynn Nelson, Wildlife Biology Program - SEROPREVALENCE OF CANINE PARVOVIRUS AND CANINE DISTEMPER IN WOLVES (CANIS LUPUS) IN RELATION TO HUMAN ACTIVITY IN THE CANADIAN ROCKY MOUNTAINS