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Dr. Angela Luis, Assistant Professor

Angie is broadly interested in the ecology of infectious disease in wildlife. She studies the impact of wildlife host ecology on disease dynamics across scales, from within-host processes, to population-level and community-level interactions, up to broadscale, world-wide patterns of disease dynamics and emergence. See Research page for more details.

Angie is originally from Oklahoma, where she received her B.S. in Zoology from the University of Oklahoma, and subsequently worked in an immunology lab for 5 years before beginning graduate school. She studied disease ecology at Penn State University, advised by Peter Hudson and Ottar Bjornstad, receiving her Ph.D. in Ecology in 2010. She then did postdoctoral research at Colorado State University with Colleen Webb and Princeton University with Bryan Grenfell, and joined the faculty at UM in 2014. In her free time she enjoys the great outdoors of Montana (hiking, climbing, snowboarding), local craft beers (especially dark beers and sours), and crafty endeavours.

Dr. Angela Luis, Assistant Professor

Andreas Eleftheriou, Ph.D. student

Andreas is generally interested in wildlife disease ecology, ecotoxicology, and conservation medicine. He decided to pursue and expand on his research interests by joining the Luis lab while he employs his veterinary knowledge and skills. His dissertation research aims to characterize the effects of stress and biodiversity on the prevalence of pathogens in wildlife species by using the deer mouse-Sin Nombre virus system as a model disease system. Andreas is particularly interested in combining field, laboratory, statistical and modeling work in his research.

Andreas came to UM from the Northeast USA, but he is originally from Cyprus. He received a B.A. in Biology with a specialization in Ecology and Conservation Biology from Boston University. Subsequently, he received an M.S. in Biological Sciences from the University of Massachusetts-Lowell and a D.V.M. from Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University where he pursued his interests in exotic pet, wildlife and conservation medicine. After a one-year veterinary training internship at the University of Pennsylvania’s Matthew J. Ryan veterinary hospital, he went on to work briefly as a Faculty Associate at Elmira College. He is now a Ph.D. candidate in Wildlife Biology in Dr. Luis’ laboratory at UM.

Andreas Eleftheriou, Ph.D. student

Emily Weidner, M.S. student

Broadly, Emily is interested in wildlife disease epidemiology and the ecology of zoonoses. Her work in the Luis lab will examine how small mammal diversity influences host density using deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) and the Sin Nombre hantavirus (SNV) as a model system. Specifically, she would like to elucidate how habitat type and productivity might drive disease transmission mechanisms. Emily would like to help bridge the science-management gap by combining theoretical and applied ecology to inform decision-making processes for wildlife disease management.

Emily is originally from Iowa but has lived in Bend, Oregon for the past nine years. She received a B.S. in Fish and Wildlife Science from Oregon State University with a specialization in wildlife management and habitat conservation. Immediately after graduation, she spent time with the United States Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management before making the move to University of Montana. Her employment history also includes fisheries work with Oregon Department of Fish and a botany internship with the United States Fish and Wildlife Service in Alaska. In her free time, Emily enjoys photography, visiting remote locales, fly-fishing, geeking out on taxonomy, and hiking with her German Shorthaired Pointer, Hintza.

Emily Weidner, M.S. student