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Wildland Restoration Program

Ecological Restoration

Learn the science and practice of repairing degraded ecosystems

Earn a B.S. or minor in Ecological Restoration and learn the scientific theories and management practices for repairing degraded forests, grasslands, rivers, and wetlands.

Learning within the ecological restoration program occurs in and outside of the classroom, with substantial emphasis on hands-on, field-based learning. You will have opportunities to conduct independent research and to plan and implement restoration projects with natural resource professionals.

The program fosters connections among students, faculty, and professionals – you’ll be part of a restoration community on and off campus and will graduate with the experience and professional network needed to launch your career. You will leave the program qualified for restoration jobs as a botanist, ecologist, forester, hydrologist, or soil conservationist, and for graduate school in the biological sciences.

Join the Ecological Restoration program so you can work at the interface between science and people, and restore lands to meet the needs of humans and the ecosystems they inhabit.

Announcements

Our program name recently changed to Ecological Restoration. Our curriculum is the same and now our name better reflects what you'll learn.

UM's Society of Ecological Restoration student chapter 
The University of Montana's student chapter of the Society for Ecological Restoration is a great way to connect with fellow restoration students to work on service projects and build your professional network. They meet twice a month during the school year. Check out their web site.
College of Forestry and Conservation ecological restoration student 
Recent graduate Mark Mariano helped with restoration research of the Milltown Dam, led a practicum project to restore a creek with Trout Unlimited, and was selected as one of the Ecological Restoration program's outstanding seniors.
Ecological restoration student at Ninemile 
All restoration students work on a practicum project their senior year. Chris Harris is monitoring the creek on his project site that has been degraded by hard rock mining. He and other classmates are working with the local Trout Unlimited office to survey the stream.