Martin Kardos

Martin Kardos

Post-doc collaborating with Gordan Luikart

Education

Ph.D Student, Organismal Biology and Ecology, Division of Biological Sciences, Montana Ecology of Infectious Diseases IGERT program, University of Montana, Missoula, Mt, Fall 2007 - present

 

Bachelor of Science, Biological Sciences, (GPA 3.84/4.00), December 16, 2005, Montana State University, Bozeman, Mt

 

Research Interests

I am broadly interested in population genetics and conservation biology. My Ph.D thesis is composed of three related areas of research: 1) the effects of inbreeding and locus-specific variation on survival, reproduction, and parasite resistance of wild bighorn sheep; 2) effects of inbreeding depression on population dynamics; and 3) assessing the power, accuracy, and precision of genetic marker- and pedigree-based tests for inbreeding depression.

Field of Study

Field of Study:

Population genetics, conservation biology

Awards:
 
1. Honorable mention, 2009 National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program
2. Montana Ecology of Infectious Diseases National Science Foundation IGERT Traineeship: 2007 – 2009 ($82,000)
3. Montana Ecology of Infectious Diseases Small Research Grant: 2009 ($2500)
4. 2005 NSF EPSCoR research grant ($500)
 
Manuscripts submitted and in prep:
 
Kardos M.D., Hogg J.T., Da Silva A., Berthier P., Allainé D., Yoccoz G., Luikart G. In Prep. Does heterozygosity at neutral and gene-linked microsatellites predict male reproductive success in a long term study of bighorn sheep? For submission to Molecular Ecology
 
Kardos M.D., Dewey S., Amish S.J., Stephenson J., Luikart G. In Prep. Strong fine-scale population structure of Grand Teton National Park bighorn sheep suggests important role of philopatry in bighorn population subdivision. For submission to Conservation Genetics
 
Luikart G., White P.J., Chen S., Cross P., Kardos M.D., Edwards H., Kauffman M., Garrett B., Hamlin K., Schwartz M. In Prep. Limited Female Migration among elk herds across the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem Revealed by Mitochondrial DNA
 
See W., Edwards H., Lowell J., Wallen R.,  Kardos M.D., Almendra C., Gardipee F., Cain S., Holben W., Luikart G. Submitted. Yersinia enterocolitica: an unlikely cause of positive brucellosis tests in Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem Bison; Submitted to Journal of Wildlife Diseases
 
Other projects in progress:
 
-          Effects of historical population dynamics and immigration on the accuracy of estimates of the pedigree inbreeding coefficient.
 
-          Refining the one migrant per generation rule in conservation and management: what is an effective migrant?
 
-          Using the cattle and domestic sheep genome sequences to develop an exon capture array for bighorn sheep. I will use sequence data from captured exons to test whether genome-wide heterozygosity and individual single nucleotide polymorphisms are related to survival, reproduction, and parasite loads of wild bighorn sheep.
 
Presentations:
 
Kardos M., Amish S., Luikart G. Genetic status of bighorn sheep in Grand Teton National Park. Teton Range Bighorn Sheep Working Group; Grand Teton National Park, 11 January 2009
 
Kardos M., Dewey S., Amish S., Stephenson J., Luikart G. Genetic Variation and Population Connectivity in Grand Teton Bighorn Sheep. Wyoming chapter of the Foundation for North American Wild Sheep annual convention; Sheridan, Wyoming, 5 June 2010
 
Kardos M., Dewey S., Amish S., Stephenson J., Luikart G. Fine scale genetic structure of bighorn sheep suggests an important role of philopatry in determining population subdivision. International Congress for Conservation Biology, July 6, 2010; Edmonton, Alberta
 
Workshops: 
Pathways to Scientific Teaching, a workshop on student inquiry-based approaches to teaching undergraduate courses in the sciences, led by Dr. Diane Ebert May; January 5-7, 2009
 
Teaching:
 
Teaching assistantships:
 
Fall 2009, 2010: Teaching Assistant; Biology 341: Ecology (with Dr. Erick Greene)
Spring 2010: Teaching Assistant Biology 341: Ecology (with Dr. Vanessa Ezenwa)
Spring 2010: Volunteer Teaching Assistant; Biology 480: Conservation Genetics (with Dr. Fred
Allendorf)
 
 
Lectures Given:
 
Inbreeding depression and pedigree analysis; Biology 480, Conservation Genetics; University of Montana; 16 March 2010
 
Population Genetics as a Tool in Ecology and Conservation; Biology 341, Ecology; University of Montana; 24 February 2010
 
Mentoring:
I have supervised three undergraduate students (Mariah Childs, Daniel Bingham and Michael Black Wolf) on undergraduate thesis projects.
 
Peer review:
 
I have reviewed submitted manuscripts for Journal of Heredity, Conservation Genetics, Animal Genetics, and Molecular Ecology Resources
 
Societies:
 
Society for Conservation Biology
Society for the Study of Evolution
 
References:
 
Dr. Fred Allendorf
Regents Professor, Division of Biological Sciences
University of Montana, Missoula
fred.allendorf@mso.umt.edu
Office: 406.243.5503
 
Dr. Gordon Luikart
Research Associate Professor, Flathead Lake Biological Station
University of Montana, Missoula
gordon.luikart@mso.umt.edu
Office: 406.243.5503 (UM main campus) 406.982.3301 (Flathead Lake Biological Station)
 
 
 
 

Affiliations

Society for Conservation Biology

Society for the Study of Evolution

Hobbies

skiing, biking, fishing, hiking, travel, great food